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NOAA > NWS > CPHC

This page was last loaded at 6:44 am HST Apr 18, 2015 (1644 GMT Apr 18, 2015)

Central Pacific (140W to 180) xml button

Tropical Outlook Sea Surface Temperatures CPAC Satellite EPAC Satellite Widgets Satellite Message Forecast Discussion

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Issued: Apr 18, 2015 2:30 AM HST


Based on data through 2:00 am Apr 18 2015 HST


The infrared satellite loop show wave after wave of showers and clouds moving ashore of windward Big Island between Upolu Point and the Puna district since sunset. This has resulted in periods of clouds and showers, alternating with periods of fair skies there. The last of these waves is about to move ashore with a scattered distribution of shower bearing clouds located upwind of the island.

Skies are fair across the Kau district of the Big Island but earlier, a rogue wave of showers reached and dissipated over that part of the island. On Kona side, cloudiness continue to dissipate with locally broken coverage between the airport and Milolii. A shower or two have broken out just off the Kona shoreline near Captain Cook. Fair skies dominated the rest of the Big Island.

One or two of the many waves bypassed the Big Island and rolled on to windward Maui. Otherwise, fair skies ruled the island's leeward section. Molokai and Lanai have been dry up to now with relatively fair skies all around. Windward and interior Kauai has had a few light showers move through although fair skies dominated. On Oahu, parts of the island continued damp from Koolau's in upper Wahiawa to the north shore. The rest of the windward section is generally dry with scattered to broken coverage. The lee side has mostly clear skies.

Satellite imagery show clouds that were over the windward waters off the Big Island and Maui at sunset are now passing north of Oahu. The leeward waters is generally clear with a stray shower here and there.

The prevailing wind flow across the main Hawaiian islands is from east to west at around 20 mph.

Elsewhere on satellite imagery, a frontal cloud band is located just north of Midway atoll. The coordinates of the front are from 32°N 170°W to 30°N 175°W to 28°N 177°E, and continues to ease southeastward near 10 kt.

Mainly high cirrus clouds continued to shroud the area far southeast of the Big Island east of a line from 22°N 140°W to 11°N 160°W. These coordinates also mark the location of an upper level trough.

Water vapor imagery shows a dry north to northwesterly wind flow over the main Hawaiian islands.

In the tropics far south of the Hawaiian islands, the small cluster of storms directly south of Oahu has dissipated. To the east, a loose area of thunderstorms has become an concentrated area of moderate to strong storms and tops to 54k feet. Scattered cumulonimbus clouds have spilled east of the dateline to 170°W, south of 10°N.

Central Pacific Infrared Satellite image for 1200 UTC


LAU

Western Pacific (West of 180)

Monitored by the:
Joint Typhoon Warning Center
Japan Meteorological Agency

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The Eastern Pacific Hurricane season runs from May 15 to November 30.

Monitored by the National Hurricane Center (NHC)

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