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NOAA > NWS > CPHC Home Page > Hurricane Awareness Week > Be Prepared
Hurricane Awareness Week
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HISTORY HURRICANE HAZARDS FORECAST PREPARE ACT
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Sunday
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Be Prepared

"Preventing the loss of life and minimizing the damage to property from hurricanes are responsibilities that are shared by all."" - Joe M. Allbaugh, FEMA Director

Hurricane Season: Are You Prepared?The most important thing that you can do to prepare for a hurricane is to be informed and to develop a personal preparedness plan.

One of the most important decisions you will have to make is "Should I Evacuate?"

If you are asked to evacuate, you should do so without delay. Unless you live in a coastal or low-lying area, an area that floods frequently, or in manufactured housing, it is unlikely that emergency managers will ask you to evacuate. That means that it is important for you and your family to HAVE A PLAN that makes you as safe as possible in your home.

Disaster prevention includes modifying your home to strengthen it against storms so that you can be as safe as possible. It also includes having the supplies on hand to weather the storm. The suggestions provided here are only guides.

  • DEVELOP A FAMILY PLAN - Your family's plan should be based on your vulnerability to the Hurricane Hazards. You should keep a written plan and share your plan with other friends or family.
  • CREATE A DISASTER SUPPLY KIT - There are certain items you need to have regardless of where you ride out a hurricane. The disaster supply kit is a useful tool when you evacuate as well as making you as safe as possible in your home.
  • SECURE YOUR HOME - There are things that you can do to make your home more secure and able to withstand stronger storms.
  • ONLINE VULNERABILITY INFORMATION - There are web sites that can give you information about your communities vulnerability to specific hazards. These include hurricanes as well as other weather related hazards.


ADDITIONAL SAFETY INFORMATION

    FAMILY DISASTER PLAN
  • Discuss the type of hazards that could affect your family. Know your home's vulnerability to storm surge, flooding and wind.
  • Locate a safe room or the safest areas in your home for each hurricane hazard. In certain circumstances the safest areas may not be your home but within your community.
  • Determine escape routes from your home and places to meet.
  • Have an out-of-state friend as a family contact, so all your family members have a single point of contact.
  • Make a plan now for what to do with your pets if you need to evacuate.
  • Post emergency telephone numbers by your phones and make sure your children know how and when to call 911.
  • Check your insurance coverage - flood damage is not usually covered by homeowners insurance. National Flood Insurance Program
  • Stock non-perishable emergency supplies and a Disaster Supply Kit.
  • Use a NOAA weather radio. Remember to replace its battery every 6 months, as you do with your smoke detectors.
  • Take First Aid, CPR and disaster preparedness classes.